surisburnbook
surisburnbook:

This has been tragically underreported, but this batsuit is what Jaden Smith wore to Kim Kardashian’s wedding. A couple of things:
First of all, of course Jaden Smith wore white to a wedding.
Second of all, Jaden Smith clearly does not understand the point of Batman. Page Six reported that he ran around for two hours knocking glasses off tables and throwing his cape over strangers’ heads. Not Batman material, that one.

surisburnbook:

This has been tragically underreported, but this batsuit is what Jaden Smith wore to Kim Kardashian’s wedding. A couple of things:

First of all, of course Jaden Smith wore white to a wedding.

Second of all, Jaden Smith clearly does not understand the point of Batman. Page Six reported that he ran around for two hours knocking glasses off tables and throwing his cape over strangers’ heads. Not Batman material, that one.

npr
nprbooks:

Check out our interview with Reading the OED author Ammon Shea about his new book, Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation.
My personal favorite language-police fact: people used to get really mad about the WORD “television” (instead of the programming, how novel) because it combines the Greek “tele” and the Latin “vision” — Manchester Guardian editor C.P. Scott famously harrumphed, “Television? The word is half Latin and half Greek. No good can come of it.”
— Petra

nprbooks:

Check out our interview with Reading the OED author Ammon Shea about his new book, Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation.

My personal favorite language-police fact: people used to get really mad about the WORD “television” (instead of the programming, how novel) because it combines the Greek “tele” and the Latin “vision” — Manchester Guardian editor C.P. Scott famously harrumphed, “Television? The word is half Latin and half Greek. No good can come of it.”

— Petra

atlasobscura

atlasobscura:

Book Towns: Where Reading is the Reason to Live

Some small towns in the rural reaches that lost their former industries have reimagined themselves as "book towns." By filling empty storefronts with used and antiquarian bookshops, and hosting literary festivals, the goal is to attract new visitors in the form of bibliophiles. 

The book towns are officially united through the International Organisation of Book Towns. The movement started in 1961 with Richard Booth in Hay-on-Wye in Wales, and now includes towns across Europe and in Malaysia, Korea, and Australia. However, the drive for a sustainable tourism development program in these rural areas has hit some hurdles in recent years with the consolidation of the used book trade online and rise of the e-book. As Adrian Turpin, director of the literary festival in Wigtown, Scotland’s book town, told the BBC in 2012:

"There was a time when second-hand book sellers in book towns were first of all selling books and secondly selling the experience of browsing. Now it is almost the other way around."

Despite these recent changes in the literary landscape, the book towns thrive on.

For five of our favorites, keep reading on Atlas Obscura…